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How to Add Keywords to Your Website Page

When adding keywords to your website, it is important to include your keyword in 6 places on each page of your website.

Including your keyword in these 6 areas will help search engines identify the subject of your page and rank your page in search results.

  1. Page Title
  2. Meta Description
  3. Header
  4. Sub Header
  5. Body Paragraphs
  6. Image Alt Tags

Page Title & Meta Description:

Page Titles & Meta Descriptions are a more technical part of key wording your website. However, it is important to recognize how valuable they can be for your INTERNET marketing efforts. What are Page Titles & Meta Descriptions? These parts of your website page actually show up in search results, they are the first impression a searcher gets of your website page.

If you do not have access to your website Page Titles or Meta Descriptions then it will be important to check with your website management company that those areas are filled out correctly for SEO.


Headers are a lot like billboards for search engines. They are one of the biggest ways to show search engines what your main subject is for your page. It is important that you include your entire keyword in your header.


Sub-headers are another area to tell search engines what you want the website page to be found for. Think of this area as real-estate, if you don’t try to include your keywords in the sub-header then you are missing out.

Body Paragraph:

When writing the body content for your website page you should try to include your keyword, or at least parts of your keyword. Remember to keep your writing natural, search engines will actually penalize you if your writing over stuffs keywords and appears unnatural. When you first try to write with keywords you might find it difficult, but keep practicing! It really does get easier, and you will get better at shaping your content for adding keywords.

Image Alt Tags:

Images are a great addition to any web-page, in fact they can even help search engines rank you. Alt tags are essentially a label that you assign to your image so that search engines can read the image. If you don’t use Alt tags for images then search engines will not see it. By key wording these image Alt Tags you are telling search engines “I used a picture and it relates to the subject of my page.”

Keyword structure counts

There are two ways to look at structure in the SEO world, and both can have a massive effect on your page authority.

Big-picture structure refers to the overall structure and navigation of your site. If your site is easy to navigate, your users will have an easier time finding the information they want, and Google will reward you for such user accommodation. Title your pages appropriately, use a header bar to make your site easy to navigate,

Also make sure there’s a crawlable site-map that lays out your site as a whole. It’s also a good idea to interlink your internal content by connecting many of your internal pages to one another — the shorter the path from any one page to any other page, the more authority you’ll gain in your site, regardless of keywords.

Small-picture structure is more about how each of your pages are laid out.

If you adhere to Google’s traditional structure of having a header, body, sidebars, and footer, and you place appropriate content for each section, Google will have an easier time scanning your page. And it will be able to derive the accurate meaning behind your site without you worrying about including specific keyword phrases.

Website Schema Markup

Schema markup provides search engines with even more information about the pages on your site, such as what is available for sale and for how much, rather than leaving it open for interpretation by the spiders and algorithm.

Although Google does tend to be relatively accurate about the purpose of websites, schema markup can help minimize the potential for any mistakes. In a increasingly competitive digital ecosystem, brands do not want to leave themselves open to errors.

Schema has also been attracting attention because of its potential to help brands trying to gain extra attention on the SERP in the form of Quick Answers and other universal content. Brands that want events included in the new Google Events SERP feature, for example, should use schema to call the search engine’s attention to the event and its details.

Things to do to make sure your site has the correct level of schema markup:

  • Markup pages that have been optimized for Quick Answers and other rich answers
  • Markup any events you list on your page or transcripts for videos
  • Check for common schema errors including spelling errors, missing slashes, and incorrect capitalization
  • Use Google’s Structured Data Testing Tool to ensure the markup has been completed correctly

Your Competitors Do Better than You On The Internet

This is one factor that’s easy to overlook. You can easily rank lower in search results than your competitors because their SEO efforts are better than yours. Put simply, your links may be good, but their links are even better.

That’s why you should run regular back-link profile audits of competitor sites. This won’t take much time, but will provide enough details to adjust your link building strategy.

To analyze back-link profiles of competitor sites, you can use tools like:

  • Ahrefs
  • Majestic SEO
  • Moz
  • SEMrush
  • SEO Spyglass
  • Raven Tools

Specifically, you should dig deeper into the number of external backspins, referring domains, referring pages, referring IPs, referring subnets, types of links (dofollow, nofollow, text, image, etc.), back-link history, and so on.

This way you will:

  • Learn more about the industry.
  • Sift out sites that are major link providers.
  • Understand your competitors and their strategies better.

You will also identify why they rank higher than you. Maybe their links are of higher quality. Maybe they craft the best content in the niche, and Google naturally loves it. Maybe it is a combination of factors like user experience, site speed, technical issues, etc. But you will get the answer.

If your links aren’t boosting your organic search rankings, then your competitors may be to blame. Never start revising your entire link building strategy before you run a detailed analysis of competitor sites.

Your Site Has a Spammy Anchor List

Google loves links, specifically high-quality editorial links that help identify websites and webpages that bring most value to users. And Google hates link schemes.

Google upgrades its algorithms that distinguish editorial links from paid ones on a regular basis by analyzing link patterns. Here are three examples:

  1. You’ve been in the cleaning business for years, but your site got zero reviews. Suddenly, Google comes across dozens of reviews about your company. All of them feature a link to your site, specifically one single inner page that describes services you provide.
  2. Your site’s backlink profile has been stable for years, but suddenly it receives 100+ inbound links. A massive spike like this, especially if you haven’t posted any content, suggests to Google that something fishy is going on.
  3. You’re smart about links and consistently earn them through guest posts. Unfortunately, all of your articles are published in the sponsored section. This is a clear sign to Google that you paid to be published and, consequently, paid for the link.

A spammy anchor list raises a big red flag to Google, too. Actually, it’s one of the easiest ways for Google to identify spam.

If 100 percent of your site’s inbound links feature one single anchor text, it suggests to Google that:

  • You do everything you can to rank for this phrase.
  • You build links artificially (i.e., purchase them).

This is why you need to diversify your anchors. Links pointing from similar anchor phrases, even if they truly are the best editorial links, will harm your site rankings. Don’t let this happen – perform regular link profile audits.

Don’t use any SEO practices that might suggest to Google that you rely on paid links rather than editorial, naturally-acquired ones. Even if your links are good, and Google thinks that they are bad, no matter what you do, your site is in a real danger zone.

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